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How to replace the "Open Powershell window here" menu with something that actually works

Since almost forever in Windows, it has been possible to shift+right-click in any explorer window to display a very convenient "Open command window here" menu.

In a recent Windows 10 update, Microsoft decided to make us understand a little more insistently they really would like us to use Powershell, and replaced this menu with an "Open Powershell window here" one.

I don't like Powershell

I don't like Powershell, and I don't intend to use it more.

For one, the Powershell command prompt tries hard to look like it is compatible with existing commands while it is really not: even though it looks like it works, you actually can't pipe binary data to another command or file with Powershell.

I also recently discovered another quirk, I guess related to the default color scheme of the prompt, that makes some texts completely disappear!

Do you notice the difference between the two following screenshots?

Classic command line prompt

Powershell prompt


This actually disrupted my workflow enough for me to try and find a way to get back to the previous menu.

Getting the old menu back, and more...

It's almost easy to configure the menu to one's tastes, and there are a lot of how-to online, but none that matched exactly what I wanted.

Since I'm going to have to edit the registry myself, I might as well add some other useful commands.

I settled on the following three:

I also removed the annoying "Open in Visual Studio" menu that is showing without even holding shift.

Registry permissions

Unfortunately, executing a .reg file is not enough. You have to take ownership of some registry keys before you can edit them.

I did not manage to do it only once on the root folder, so I had to take ownership and give myself full permissions on the following two keys:

Computer\HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Directory\Background\shell\Powershell
Computer\HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Directory\Background\shell\cmd

Registry permissions

Once you have done that, you can edit the keys.

Here are the .reg scripts:

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Formatting cheat sheet.